Rethinking College Student Retention

Rethinking College Student Retention
Author : John M. Braxton
Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
Total Pages : 320
Release : 2013-10-21
ISBN 10 : 9781118415665
ISBN 13 : 1118415663
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

Rethinking College Student Retention Book Description:

Drawing on studies funded by the Lumina Foundation, the nation'slargest private foundation focused solely on increasing Americans'success in higher education, the authors revise current theories ofcollege student departure, including Tinto's, making the importantdistinction between residential and commuter colleges anduniversities, and thereby taking into account the role of theexternal environment and the characteristics of social communitiesin student departure and retention. A unique feature of theauthors' approach is that they also consider the role that thevarious characteristics of different states play in degreecompletion and first-year persistence. First-year college student retention and degree completion is amulti-layered, multi-dimensional problem, and the book'srecommendations for state- and institutional-level policy andpractice will help policy-makers and planners at all levels as wellas anyone concerned with institutional retention rates—andhelping students reach their maximum potential forsuccess—understand the complexities of the issue and developpolicies and initiatives to increase student persistence.


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